‘Twas the Night Before the Second Coming

‘Twas the night before the second coming and all through the church,
there was no focus on the second, but only the first.
The banners were hung by the pulpit with care,
in hopes that baby Jesus soon would be there.

The children in the nursery were ready for bed,
while visions of mangers danced in their heads.
Our pastor was a shepherd and I, a small lamb.
Toes started tapping as our Christmas program began.

When out in the parking lot there arose such a clatter,
we sprang from our pews to see what was the matter!
Away to the windows we flew like a flash.
We saw a bright light and a boom and a crash!

A trumpet was sounding, how could we know?
It was Jesus descending, right in the middle of our show! 
And then to our wondering eyes did appear, 
Saints all around, meeting Him up in the air! 

It was like in slow motion, but it was also lively and quick,
Jesus was coming! This was really it! 

More rapid than eagles, old Bibles verses came,
whistling and shouting about how things would change. 
Now justice! Now judgment! Now all is made right!
On knowledge! On beauty! Faith now becomes sight! 

Jesus was glorious and held a bright sword.
It’s the Day, it’s the Day, it is the Day of the Lord! 

And then, in a twinkling, we saw this great proof,
lambs, cubs and calves with their cute little hoofs;
were walking with leopards and lions and bears;
they all got along without even one care.

As we drew in our heads – back inside the church, 
we fell down to worship, our hearts they did burst!
Jesus provided the program that day.
He brought peace to the earth in a new, special way.

Now celebrating wise men, and mangers and such, 
that’s all great too, but it isn’t enough.

The Advent that should matter the most to the Church, 
is Christ’s second coming, not just the first.

And so we proclaim: Hallelujah! Amen!
Jesus came once, and He’s coming again!


Note: I wrote this poem while preaching on Isaiah 11:1-10. Historically, Advent is about the second coming of Christ; but this is often lost in our Christmas celebrations. While Christmas and the first Advent are also glorious, our hope for peace is set in the doctrine of Jesus’ return.

I tried to stay away from secondary eschatological arguments in this poem, focusing instead on broad truths about Christ’s return.

– Pastor Craig Schill

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